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Endless Bore: Melbourne Fastcore Crew Reveal New Record ‘What Do You Dig For​?​!’

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If you like fast-gnashing guitars, obliterating blast beats and a full-bore hardcore attitude at maximum volume, Endless Bore is for you. While their influences are numerous, the band rages in the same battlegrounds occupied by Infest, Charles Bronson and their fellow Aussie mates from Extortion. Following two fierce records and a split with Sydney’s Numbskull, […]

The post Endless Bore: Melbourne Fastcore Crew Reveal New Record ‘What Do You Dig For​?​!’ first appeared on DIY Conspiracy – International Zine in the Spirit of DIY Hardcore Punk!

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If you like fast-gnashing guitars, obliterating blast beats and a full-bore hardcore attitude at maximum volume, Endless Bore is for you.

While their influences are numerous, the band rages in the same battlegrounds occupied by Infest, Charles Bronson and their fellow Aussie mates from Extortion. Following two fierce records and a split with Sydney’s Numbskull, Endless Bore explode with fury on their new seven-track What Do You Dig For?! EP.

We are psyched to share an exclusive early stream of this raucous record that officially releases on January 21st. For those looking for physical copies,What Do You Dig For?! will be available on a limited lathe cut 10″ vinyl and CD directly from the band. DIY all the way! 

Check it out and read our interview with singer Dave below!

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📸 Phiney

So, where did it all begin for Endless Bore? Give us a background on how the band got started.

We formed in late 2018. Our guitarist David had already written a load of songs and found the rest of us to complete the band. We played our first gig in March 2019 and soon after released Personal Development.

Since then, we’ve played another 15 gigs and put out two more releases, Treatment Resistant and the split with Numbskull.

Our former drummer Mark moved to the other side of Australia at the beginning of last year, after we recorded What Do You Dig For?! We now have a new lineup with Retch on drums and will return live next month.

How did you get into fast music and stuff? The impact from bands like Infest, Charles Bronson, Spazz, etc. is obvious but what about any local bands that influenced your music?

Yeah, those classic US bands are in the mix, along with the likes of RAMBO, What Happens Next?, and Coke Bust. I grew up in Scotland and spent a good chunk of my twenties touring Europe in Filthpact (crust) and Ablach (grindcore). I saw tons of great fast hardcore/thrashcore bands, which have certainly influenced me: Atömgevitter, Clocked Out, Hero Dishonest, Fighting Shit, Vitamin X, See You In Hell, Boxed In, Step On It and Thrashington D.C. Collectively, we also tip our hat to some gnarly Australian bands: All In Deep Shit, Cut Sick, Straightjacket Nation and Extortion to name but a few.

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Endless Bore @ Last Chance Rock N Roll, 📸 Buff G

What influenced you writing the new songs and what issues do you deal with lyrically? Is the band a personal vehicle, or something more political?

Ben (bass) wrote more stuff this time, and it has sludgier elements amongst the fast—I guess along the lines of Dystopia or Eyehategod (his favourite band). The vocals are also slightly different than previous releases in that there’s less screaming and more shouting. I’d been listening to the new Incisions record BLISS a lot at that time, though I’m not saying it sounds anything like that.

Lyrically, I treat Endless Bore as a cathartic vessel, releasing my frustrations with society/existence, often in an exaggerated or imaginary manner. The title What Do You Dig For?!, whilst fitting well with the band name, ties the songs’ themes together: The deflection of responsibility, pausing to reflect on where you’re at in life, societal expectations/social control (with more than an artistic nod to John Carpenter’s They Live), the decay of age, modern life’s relentless oppression, the trappings of easy credit, and musculoskeletal pain.

Australia has been known for its strict lockdowns and tough quarantines. What, in your opinion, is proper to respond to the pandemic? What about border restrictions regarding immigrants and refugees? What’s your take on Novak Djokovic’s case?

Haha, I am a social worker by trade, not an epidemiologist. I can tell you that the lockdowns and closed borders here were brutal to live through, particularly for those with family elsewhere and those trying to run small businesses. They did stop the spread of earlier Covid-19 strains and prevented the loss of life that other countries saw, and they seemed to be generally supported by the public. That’s not to say they were perfect. Poor planning and mistakes made by federal and state governments led to longer restrictions than we perhaps should have needed. We’re now being ravaged by Omicron, with far less government supports in place. Conversely, public safety measures seem to loosen by the day, increasing risks for those at the bottom of the chain the most.

Australia’s immigration policies (i.e. the mandatory detention of “unlawful” arrivals in offshore processing facilities, including those seeking asylum as refugees) are simply disgusting. Novak’s case has been the media circus I’d expect from an incompetent do-nothing Prime Minister and an entitled sports star. It seems there’s blame on both sides, and I’m not particularly interested in it. We’ve repeatedly seen illogical exceptions made for the haves (and the groups they support) throughout this pandemic. Positively, it did at least cast the spotlight, albeit fleetingly, on those poor bastards (i.e. refugees brought onshore for medical treatment) who’ve been locked up in hotel accommodation for months on end (some well over a year).

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Endless Bore @ Swamplands, Thornbury, 📸 David Chambers

What impacts do you think the Covid pandemic had on the DIY scene? What changes are you seeing taking place around you?

It has impacted the ability to plan and organise. You don’t know what the lay of the land will be like next week. Many gigs have been cancelled or postponed (often repeatedly), and bands can no longer tour. There were moments where things got back to some sense of normal functioning, but then something else came along and slammed the brakes back on. We’ve played live once in almost two years. Some bands have made an effort to perform via different mediums or in alternative settings (i.e. online streaming and outdoor events). Others are just holing up, writing and recording new material, hoping they get to play it in a live environment one day. The presence of technology and social media has grown, with bands ever-increasingly becoming online entities. We wrote new songs and recorded/mixed them remotely when it was impossible to do so in person. Platforms like Instagram seem to have boomed in use, offering quick and easy (though not particularly wholesome) audience engagement regardless of location or restrictions.

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Endless Bore @ Bombay Rock, Brunswick, 📸 Matt Gleeson

Which are the active venues and bands in Melbourne at the moment, are you involved in booking shows or doing anything else besides playing in Endless Bore?

Melbourne has hundreds of bands and several scenes. We seem to be outsiders to most of it. I’ve recently enjoyed listening to Geld, Szkło, Burn The Hostages and Derailment. Australia wide, Toy and World Of Joy are worth checking out too.

I am not aware of any DIY punk venues here (or at least nothing akin to the autonomous spaces of Europe), though I attended a handful of shows at The Black Goat before it closed in 2015, which were excellent. There are, however, hundreds of live music venues (for all those bands to play at), many host hardcore punk. I have particularly enjoyed playing our last two gigs at The Last Chance (an inner-city dive bar with a neat band room) and The Bergy Seltzer (a tiny little pub where bands play on the floor squashed up within arm’s reach of the bar).

I book local gigs (so we can play) under the moniker Suburban Discomfort. I brought Numbskull over from Sydney for a couple of dates back in 2020 (just before Covid-19 started to be an issue) and have vague plans to invite other bands when circumstances allow. I also have a young family, a dog with reactivity issues, and a half renovated house to take up my free time.

What is your vision of the general state of affairs, the DIY punk scene and the world in 2022?

I’m just taking one day at a time… Thanks heaps for the feature!

Find Endless Bore on Bandcamp, Facebook and Instagram.

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Source: diyconspiracy.net

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